Monitoring Budget Implementation

What is this workshop about?

IBP’s Monitoring Budget Implementation (MBI) Training Workshop addresses the capacity needs of civil society organizations (CSOs) planning to monitor the implementation of government budgets, or of those CSOs that are already doing so but would like to deepen and sharpen their knowledge and skills. The workshop consists of an intensive  ten-day  learning  experience  and  helps  participants  to  develop  substantial  and practical competence in budget monitoring and advocacy work.

The goal of IBP’s MBI Training Workshop is to develop and strengthen the skills base, capacities, and strategic visions of CSOs that are committed to having an impact on budget implementation, so that they are better equipped to:

  • accurately diagnose the budget implementation problems underlying development problems;
  • select appropriate monitoring methods and tools to address these problems; and
  • apply the methods and tools to support their budget advocacy strategies.

Who are these materials for?

These materials are intended to be used by trainers/facilitators who have some experience and familiarity with civil society budget monitoring and advocacy work and who would like to build the capacity of civil society organizations to monitor budget implementation.

How can these materials be used?

The MBI Training Workshop consists of eight modules. Each module is relatively self-contained and can be expanded or condensed to suit the needs of the trainees. Experienced trainers may also choose to rearrange the sequence of the modules, although care should be taken to preserve the cumulative learning that takes place through simulation activities as the workshop proceeds.

The core of the workshop features extended simulation activities based on a case study set in the fictional country of Polarus. This learning strategy allows participants to delve into budget implementation problems in a hands-on manner in the workshop, as well as provides the foundational knowledge and skills required to monitor budget implementation in other contexts. It also lays the foundation for follow-up technical assistance provision and/or participation in other courses related to budget analysis, monitoring, and advocacy.

For more detailed guidance on facilitating this workshop, please refer to the General Facilitation Notes, which include information on the educational approach of the workshop, the Polarus simulation activities, the composition of the facilitation team, evaluating the workshop, and energizers.

What does this page contain?

This page contains all of the materials that a team of facilitators would need to run an MBI Training Workshop. For ease of use, the materials are divided into eight separate modules. These materials include:

  • facilitator’s guides;
  • PowerPoint presentations;
  • supporting materials for facilitators (e.g., exercise cards);
  • materials for participants (i.e., task sheets, readings, and reference materials); and
  • the Country of Polarus: Monitoring Budget Implementation Sourcebook (“The Polarus Sourcebook”).

The Facilitator’s Guide for each module provides guidance and content information to support facilitators of the workshop. Each guide presents an outline of each module, as well as detailed notes about each session, including time allocations, activities, information to support inputs, and guidelines for facilitating the learning process. The Guides also refer to the task sheets, readings, and reference materials that are used by the participants. The Guide is also available in its entirety.

If you have any questions about these materials and their use, please contact IBP’s Capacity Building Team at info@internationalbudget.org.

 

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Module 1: Introduction to Monitoring Budget Implementation

By the end of this module, participants will have:

  • introduced each other;
  • outlined the goals and content of the workshop;
  • identified when and how to help evaluate the workshop;
  • prepared posters with summaries of their organizations and budget work; and
  • explained how other CSOs have monitored the budget implementation process.
Materials for Facilitators

Materials for Participants

Module 2: Defining the Problem

By the end of this module, participants will have:

  • explained the stages of the budget process and the budget execution process in particular;
  • defined the budget documents that are produced during the budget execution process;
  • identified the key decision makers in the budget execution process;
  • listed the types of budget information required to conduct budget implementation monitoring;
  • recognized that development problems can be linked to underlying budget problems;
  • identified and diagnosed different types of budget implementation problems; and
  • described the fictional country of Polarus and recognized its role as a learning device in the workshop.
Materials for Facilitators

Materials for Participants

 

 

Module 3: Access to Information for Monitoring

By the end of this module, participants will have:

  • recognized the importance of information for budget work;
  • explained what budget information should be made publicly available;
  • outlined the range of different documents that are relevant for budget advocacy work;
  • identified gaps in available budget documents/information;
  • explained the purpose and process of the “Ask Your Government Campaign” and its key findings;
  • described and gave examples of the access to information process in their countries;
  • recognized barriers to accessing budget information; and
  • listed strategies for overcoming some barriers to accessing budget information.
Materials for Facilitators

Materials for Participants

Module 4: Budget Advocacy (Part 1)

By the end of this module, participants will have:

  • described the key elements of an advocacy strategy;
  • developed a strategic budget advocacy objective;

recognized the importance of developing a budget advocacy strategy;

  • linked budget analysis to an advocacy strategy;
  • appreciated the importance and potential of alliances and coalitions in budget advocacy work;
  • summarized the guidelines for building effective coalitions and alliances; and
  • identified potential allies for budget advocacy work.
Materials for Facilitators

Materials for Participants

Module 5: Using Surveys to Monitor Budget Implementation

By the end of this module, participants will have:

  • discussed their previous experience using surveys;
  • examined case studies of civil society budget work using surveys;
  • reviewed some of the types of surveys used in budget monitoring work;
  • assessed three types of survey questionnaires used for budget monitoring;
  • practiced developing survey questions; and
  • analyzed data tables from a survey on maternal health services in Polarus and documented their initial findings.
Materials for Facilitators

Materials for Participants

Module 6: Using Primary Information to Monitor Budget Implementation

By the end of this module, participants will have:

  • identified different kinds of primary budget documentation and explained what each is used for;
  • recognized when primary information may be a useful tool for budget monitoring;
  • analyzed program invoices and drawn conclusions about expenditures on a government program; and
  • used some initial conclusions from their analysis of program expenditure invoices to build and support a budget advocacy objective.
Materials for Facilitators

Materials for Participants

Module 7: Using Secondary Information to Monitor Budget Implementation

By the end of this module, participants will have:

  • recognized why and how organizations analyze secondary budget information to support their advocacy work;
  • defined some key terms and phrases relevant to budget documents and budget monitoring;
  • identified and read different kinds of secondary budget information;
  • explained the types of budget implementation monitoring that can be done using secondary information;
  • described the different phases of the budget oversight process;
  • outlined the roles of oversight bodies in monitoring budget implementation; and
  • used an audit report, legislative committee report, and annual report of a government department to evaluate the performance of that department.
Materials for Facilitators

Materials for Participants

Module 8: Matching Problems to Methods & Tools

By the end of this module, participants will have:

  • recognized that each monitoring tool is appropriate and suited to specific situations and problems in budget implementation;
  • identified which monitoring tool(s) would work best in a range of different scenarios; and
  • explained which tools are most feasible to use in their own contexts, given their development priorities, budget problems, and organization capacity.
Materials for Facilitators

Materials for Participants

Module 4: Budget Advocacy – Part II

By the end of this module, participants will have:

  • highlighted the importance of using media for an advocacy campaign;
  • recognized the value of different types of media for advocacy, including traditional mass media and community-based media;
  • explained various techniques for gaining media attention;
  • formulated a clear budget advocacy message;
  • framed advocacy messages for different audiences; and
  • prepared and delivered basic budget advocacy presentations.
Materials for Facilitators

 

Materials for Participants

Evaluation, Certification, and Closure

By the end of this module, participants will have:

  • provided feedback on the workshop, training materials, and their learning experience;
  • evaluated and closed the workshop;
  • begun building a new network of budget advocates with their fellow participants; and
  • gained a sense of accomplishment through their participation in the workshop.
Materials for Facilitators

Materials for Participants