Working Papers

The Open Budget Initiative conducts or commissions in-depth research in a number of areas, including the causes and consequences of greater or lesser budget transparency, participation, and accountability, using both qualitative and quantitative analyses. The preliminary results of such research are presented in Working Papers that can be downloaded from this page. These are aimed at a more academic audience with a specific interest in the economic, political, and other factors that affect and are affected by differing levels of budget transparency, participation, and accountability. This research also aims to inform IBP’s longer-term strategies and interventions.

The Road to 61: Achieving Sufficient Levels of Budget Transparency

by Babacar Sarr and Joel Friedman | Using data from the last four rounds of the Open Budget Survey, this paper closely examines the countries whose scores place them in the middle of the Open Budget Index and seeks to answer what these countries can do to increase their scores above 60 — a rough benchmark for when a country can be considered to be publishing sufficient budget information to permit informed public discussions on budgetary matters.
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IBP Working Paper 1: Budget Transparency and Financial Markets

by Farhan Hameed | The link between transparency and financial markets has received considerable attention in the recent years. This paper sheds some light on this issue using an indicator of budget transparency based on a comprehensive global survey conducted by the International Budget Partnership in 2008.
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IBP Working Paper 2: Mineral Wealth and Budget Transparency

by Michael Ross | How does a country’s mineral wealth affect the transparency of the government’s budget? There is some evidence that among autocracies, oil reduces transparency because it helps dictators stay in power.
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IBP Working Paper 3: Political Determinants of Fiscal Transparency

by Joachim Wehner, London School of Economics and Political Science, and Paolo de Renzio, International Budget Partnership | This paper focuses on two important sources of domestic demand for open budgeting: citizens and legislators. Our results suggest that free and fair elections have a significant direct effect on budgetary disclosure, and that they dampen the adverse effect on fiscal transparency of dependence on natural resource revenues.
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IBP Working Paper 4: Budget Transparency and Development Outcomes and Rights

by Sakiko Fukuda-Parr, the New School, Patrick Guyer, Social Science Research Council, and Terra Lawson-Remer, the New School | This paper explores the relationship between the quality of the budget process and human development outcomes.
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IBP Working Paper 5: Credibility and Reliability of Government Budgets: Does Fiscal Transparency Matter?

by Babacar Sarr, International Budget Partnership | This paper explores the role of fiscal transparency in affecting budget credibility and reliability, paying particular attention to its effect on budget execution and on the quality of macroeconomic assumptions upon which the budget is based.
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Comrades or Culprits? Donor Engagement and Budget Transparency

by Paolo de Renzio, International Budget Partnership, and Diego Angemi | This article looks at the role of donor agencies in promoting or preventing budget transparency in aid dependent countries.
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