Founded on 10 December 1998 in Cape Town, South Africa, The Treatment Action Campaign (TAC) advocates for increased access to treatment, care, and support services for people living with HIV and campaigns to reduce new HIV infections. TAC will work joinly with the Center for Economic Governance and Aids in Africa (CEGAA) to increase access to affordable and equitable good-quality health services for persons living with HIV/AIDS and TB at subnational (local) level in two districts in South Africa. Read TAC’s Profile

Details

Name
  • Phillip Mokoena Chief Operating Officer
More info
Address
  • Westminster House, 2nd Floor
    122 Longmarket Street
    PO Box 2069
    Cape Town 8001
    South Africa
Area of Expertise

Community organizing and citizen mobliization, HIV/AIDS and access to anti-retrovirals, and medicine procurement.

Publications
In the Face of Crisis: The Treatment Action Campaign Fights Government Inertia with Budget Advocacy and Litigation
Major Current Activities

  • In the Face of Crisis: The Treatment Action Campaign Fights Government Inertia with Budget Advocacy and Litigation – From Analysis to Impact: Partnership Initiative Case Study Series.
  • TAC's Profile 2011 – Briefly describes the main budget analysis and advocacy activities of the organization and its involvement with the International Budget Partnership's Partnership Initiative.
  • Through a joint-effort supported by the Partnership Initative, TAC and CEGAA seek to increase access to affordable and equitable good quality health services for persons living with HIV/AIDS and TB at subnational level, in two districts in South Africa. TAC and CEGAA seek to alter nonparticipatory governmental budget processes at local or district level by buliding the capacity of citizens/communities and local government officials to monitor budget formulation and implementation for HIV/AIDS and TB at district level.

Newsletters And Regular Reports

Equal Treatment - Equal Treatment, or just ET, is TAC's high-quality magazine dedicated to covering health and HIV matters. It is produced five times a year and currently translated into isiXhosa, isiZulu and Setsonga.