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The Road to Budget Transparency in Mexico

The Road to Budget Transparency in Mexico

September 2017 | by Diego de la Mora and Javier Garduño
budget transparency in mexico
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The Open Budget Index assigns countries covered by the International Budget Partnership’s Open Budget Survey a transparency score on a 100-point scale using 109 of the Survey’s 140 questions. These questions focus specifically on whether the government provides the public with timely access to comprehensive budget information based on the public availability and content of eight key budget documents that all governments should publish over the different stages of the budget cycle. A score of roughly 60 is considered to represent the level at which countries are publishing sufficient information to allow public discussions on the budget to occur.

In the 2006 and 2008 rounds of the Open Budget Survey, Mexico’s Open Budget Index score fell in the middle range. However, beginning in 2009 the Mexican Ministry of Finance started taking budget transparency seriously, which was reflected by an increase in Open Budget Index scores in the 2012 and 2015 rounds. This case study examines why the Mexican government decided to enhance fiscal transparency and which actions were put in place both to start and to maintain the upward trend.

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The Road to Budget Transparency in Indonesia

The Road to Budget Transparency in Indonesia

September 2017 | by Yuha Farhan
budget transparency in indonesia
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The Open Budget Index assigns countries covered by the International Budget Partnership’s Open Budget Survey a transparency score on a 100-point scale using 109 of the Survey’s 140 questions. These questions focus specifically on whether the government provides the public with timely access to comprehensive budget information based on the public availability and content of eight key budget documents that all governments should publish over the different stages of the budget cycle. A score of roughly 60 is considered to represent the level at which countries are publishing sufficient information to allow public discussions on the budget to occur.

Budget transparency has become a widely accepted recipe for good governance. However, according to the Open Budget Survey, many countries remain stuck at intermediate levels. Indonesia is one of those countries. This case study aims to explain why budget transparency in Indonesia has not managed to move beyond intermediate levels by examining government and civil society initiatives that have influenced budget transparency and exploring why these initiatives did not lead to sustainable improvements.

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When Opportunity Beckons: The Impact of the Public Service Accountability Monitor’s Work on Improving Health Budgets in South Africa

By Alta Fölscher (Mokoro, Ltd.) and John Kruger (Oxford Policy Management).

The Eastern Cape Province of South Africa struggles with high poverty, poor public infrastructure, and dysfunctional administrative systems. One result is that the Eastern Cape has the worst health outcomes in the country. This case study illustrates how a South African civil society organization has used its budgetary analysis to advocate for improvements in health service delivery.

The full versionshort summary, and one page summary of this case study are available in English.

Taking the State to Court: CELS Uses Strategic Litigation to Access Public Information and Advance Human Rights in Argentina

The Open Budget Survey 2008, an independent analysis of national budget transparency and accountability in 85 countries, shows that governments around the world withhold a substantial amount of information about how they collect and spend public funds. In many countries governments also provide very little of the information needed to evaluate spending for and outcomes of specific public programs, making it very difficult for individuals and civil society organizations (CSOs) to advocate for better public policies.